Plant water use

Plant water use

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Estimate by multiplying relevant production metrics by default green water factors

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

Internal records

Notes

Plant water use or evapotranspiration is effectively the ‘green’ water footprint for a given geographical area, if it is assumed that all plant water use is production-related (see Water Footprint). Otherwise, non-production related evapotranspiration should be deducted from total plant water use to derive the green water footprint.

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Estimate from modelled or measured water inflows (precipitation) minus water outflows (run-off at field level), assuming all evapotranspiration is production-related.

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

Precipitation, modelled runoff and modelled plant evapotranspiration estimates for Australian river regions can be obtained from BoM Australian Water Outlook.

Notes

Plant water use or evapotranspiration is effectively the ‘green’ water footprint for a given geographical area, if it is assumed that all plant water use is production-related (see Water Footprint). Otherwise, non-production related evapotranspiration should be deducted from total plant water use to derive the green water footprint.

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Estimate from modelled or measured water inflows (precipitation) minus water outflows (run-off at field level), assuming all evapotranspiration is production-related.

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

Precipitation, modelled runoff and modelled plant evapotranspiration estimates for Australian river regions can be obtained from BoM Australian Water Outlook.

Notes

Plant water use or evapotranspiration is effectively the ‘green’ water footprint for a given geographical area, if it is assumed that all plant water use is production-related (see Water Footprint). Otherwise, non-production related evapotranspiration should be deducted from total plant water use to derive the green water footprint.

Water withdrawal and consumption

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Related framework/metric

TNFD Metrics: A3.0, A3.1, A3.2, A3.3, C3.0

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Estimate from average water extraction rates, multiplied by assumed percentage non-renewable or diverted

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

Internal records

Notes

Consumptive use refers to human appropriation of surface water or groundwater, as opposed to human appropriation of evaporative flows of water from a catchment (which is captured under the metric ‘Plant water use’). Consumptive water use includes the extraction of water that is either not recharged, or used beyond its recharge rate (signs of this might include declining groundwater levels or lake/river levels or flow rates), or diverted away from other ecosystem uses (for example, water used for irrigation or stock drinking water). This is is broadly equivalent to the concept of the ‘blue’ water footprint (see https://waterfootprint.org). Consumptive water use can be calculated in absolute quantities of water, and/or multiplied by a water scarcity index (e.g. AWARE <https://wulca-waterlca.org>) to calculate a water scarcity footprint. Alternatively, measurement of consumptive water use can focus on use of water from water-stressed catchments. Components of consumptive water use (e.g. water extracted, water losses, water used and water returned) may be recorded separately. Variants of this metric include TNFD <https://tnfd.global> core disclosure metric C3.0: “Water withdrawal and consumption (m³) from areas of water scarcity, including identification of water source. Water consumption is equal to water withdrawal less water discharge. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-5 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf> Surface water; groundwater; seawater; produced water; third-party water. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-3 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf>.” and additional disclosure metrics A3.0: “Total volume of water withdrawal and consumption (m³)”, A3.1: “Volume of water (m³) replenished to the environment through replenishment programmes (split into total and to areas of water scarcity)”, A3.2: “Total volume (m³) or percentage of water (total, freshwater, other) reduced, reused or recycled” and A3.3: “Volume (m³) of water loss mitigated.”

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Related framework/metric

TNFD Metrics: A3.0, A3.1, A3.2, A3.3, C3.0

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Estimate from measured extraction flow rates and national/state/territory water data

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

Groundwater level data and trends for Australian groundwater aquifers can be obtained from BoM Australian Groundwater Insight.
Streamflow data and trends for Australian rivers can be obtained from BoM Hydrologic Reference Stations.

Notes

Consumptive use refers to human appropriation of surface water or groundwater, as opposed to human appropriation of evaporative flows of water from a catchment (which is captured under the metric ‘Plant water use’). Consumptive water use includes the extraction of water that is either not recharged, or used beyond its recharge rate (signs of this might include declining groundwater levels or lake/river levels or flow rates), or diverted away from other ecosystem uses (for example, water used for irrigation or stock drinking water). This is is broadly equivalent to the concept of the ‘blue’ water footprint (see https://waterfootprint.org). Consumptive water use can be calculated in absolute quantities of water, and/or multiplied by a water scarcity index (e.g. AWARE <https://wulca-waterlca.org>) to calculate a water scarcity footprint. Alternatively, measurement of consumptive water use can focus on use of water from water-stressed catchments. Components of consumptive water use (e.g. water extracted, water losses, water used and water returned) may be recorded separately. Variants of this metric include TNFD <https://tnfd.global> core disclosure metric C3.0: “Water withdrawal and consumption (m³) from areas of water scarcity, including identification of water source. Water consumption is equal to water withdrawal less water discharge. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-5 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf> Surface water; groundwater; seawater; produced water; third-party water. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-3 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf>.” and additional disclosure metrics A3.0: “Total volume of water withdrawal and consumption (m³)”, A3.1: “Volume of water (m³) replenished to the environment through replenishment programmes (split into total and to areas of water scarcity)”, A3.2: “Total volume (m³) or percentage of water (total, freshwater, other) reduced, reused or recycled” and A3.3: “Volume (m³) of water loss mitigated.”

Type (see Help & Glossary diagram)

Impact driver

Units

ML/ha

Related framework/metric

TNFD Metrics: A3.0, A3.1, A3.2, A3.3, C3.0

Example Target

Benchmark against best practice

Example approach

Measure using on-site flow meters and water level loggers

Example methods/guidance/data sources/references

TBD – please submit your suggestion at the feedback tab in the bottom right hand corner.

Notes

Consumptive use refers to human appropriation of surface water or groundwater, as opposed to human appropriation of evaporative flows of water from a catchment (which is captured under the metric ‘Plant water use’). Consumptive water use includes the extraction of water that is either not recharged, or used beyond its recharge rate (signs of this might include declining groundwater levels or lake/river levels or flow rates), or diverted away from other ecosystem uses (for example, water used for irrigation or stock drinking water). This is is broadly equivalent to the concept of the ‘blue’ water footprint (see https://waterfootprint.org). Consumptive water use can be calculated in absolute quantities of water, and/or multiplied by a water scarcity index (e.g. AWARE <https://wulca-waterlca.org>) to calculate a water scarcity footprint. Alternatively, measurement of consumptive water use can focus on use of water from water-stressed catchments. Components of consumptive water use (e.g. water extracted, water losses, water used and water returned) may be recorded separately. Variants of this metric include TNFD <https://tnfd.global> core disclosure metric C3.0: “Water withdrawal and consumption (m³) from areas of water scarcity, including identification of water source. Water consumption is equal to water withdrawal less water discharge. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-5 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf> Surface water; groundwater; seawater; produced water; third-party water. Reference: GRI (2018) GRI 303-3 <https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/media/1909/gri-303-water-and-effluents-2018.pdf>.” and additional disclosure metrics A3.0: “Total volume of water withdrawal and consumption (m³)”, A3.1: “Volume of water (m³) replenished to the environment through replenishment programmes (split into total and to areas of water scarcity)”, A3.2: “Total volume (m³) or percentage of water (total, freshwater, other) reduced, reused or recycled” and A3.3: “Volume (m³) of water loss mitigated.”

Last updated: 21st September 2023